Welcome What's new in Chrome extensions API reference Samples
Welcome What's new in Chrome extensions API reference Samples

Migrate to event-driven background scripts

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Warning

The Chrome Web Store no longer accepts Manifest V2 extensions. Please use Manifest V3 when building new extensions. You will find a section on upgrading in the navigation tree at the left, including the Manifest V2 support timeline.

Implementing non-persistent background scripts will greatly reduce the resource cost of your extension. Most extension functionality can be supported by an event based background script. Only under rare circumstances should an extension have a persistent background, as they constantly consume system resources and can cause a strain on lower-powered devices.

Enhance an extension's performance by migrating a persistent background script to an event-based non-persistent model. By default, "persistent" is set to true.

Designate persistence as false

Locate the "background" key in the extension manifest file, then add or update the "persistent" field to false.

{
"name": "My extension",
...
"background": {
"scripts": ["background.js"],
"persistent": false
},
...
}

The same applies to background scripts that rely on an HTML file.

{
"name": "My extension",
...
"background": {
"page": "background.html",
"persistent": false
},
...
}

Surface event listeners

Listeners must be at the top-level to activate the background script if an important event is triggered. Registered listeners may need to be restructred to a synchronous pattern. Structuring listeners, as below, will not allow them to be invoked because they are not registered synchronously.

chrome.storage.local.get('runtimeEvents', function (events) {
for (let event of events)
chrome.runtime[event].addListener(listener);
});

Instead, keep listeners at top-level and unnested.

chrome.runtime.onStartup.addListener(function() {
// run startup function
})

Record state changes in storage

Use the storage API to set and return states and values. Use local.set to update on the local machine.

  chrome.storage.local.set({ variable: variableInformation });

Use local.get to grab the value of that variable.

chrome.storage.local.get(['variable'], function(result) {
let awesomeVariable = result.variable;
// Do something with awesomeVariable
});

Transform timers into alarms

DOM-based timers, such as window.setTimeout() or window.setInterval(), are not honored in non-persistent background scripts if they trigger when the event page is dormant.

let timeout = 1000 * 60 * 3;  // 3 minutes in milliseconds
window.setTimeout(function() {
alert('Hello, world!');
}, timeout);

Instead, use the alarms API.

chrome.alarms.create({delayInMinutes: 3.0})

Then add a listener.

chrome.alarms.onAlarm.addListener(function() {
alert("Hello, world!")
});

Update calls for background script functions

If using extension.getBackgroundPage to call a function from the background page, update to runtime.getBackgroundPage. The newer method activates the non-persistent script before returning it.

function backgroundFunction() {
alert('Background, reporting for duty!')
}
document.getElementById('target').addEventListener('click', function(){
chrome.extension.getBackgroundPage().backgroundFunction();
});

This method won't work if the background script is inactive, which is the default state for a non-persistent script. The newer method includes a callback function to ensure the background script has loaded.

document.getElementById('target').addEventListener('click', function() {
chrome.runtime.getBackgroundPage(function(backgroundPage){
backgroundPage.backgroundFunction()
})
});

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